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Women Who Drink More Are Smarter And Likely To Be Highly Qualified, Says Study

Women Who Drink More Are Smarter And Likely To Be Highly Qualified, Says Study

A study conducted on the relationship between a person's IQ level and their alcohol consumption tendencies revealed that women with higher educational qualifications tend to drink more.

Have you ever paused to wonder some people choose to drink, smoke, and maybe even indulge in recreational drugs, while others give these habits a wide berth? What is it that motivates an individual to partake in these often frowned upon activities? Why do they overlook the countless harmful effects of these substances and quite enjoy having their daily glass of wine? Researchers at the London School of Economics tackled this very question in their study titled Intelligence and Substance Use. Apparently, the consumption of such substances is a sign of greater intelligence. How about that?

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More specifically, the study revealed that women with higher educational degrees tend to drink twice as much on a daily basis as compared to those who haven't attended university. The research, which is based on data accumulated on people at the age of 39, further claims that it's almost the same when it comes to men. It discovered that while educated women were 71  percent more prone to drink on most days, men with similar levels of educational qualification were 49 percent more likely to consume alcohol on most days. There's your answer to everyone who's given you the stink eye for enjoying a drink every now and then.

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As per the Savanna-IQ Interaction Hypothesis, "less intelligent individuals have greater difficulty than more intelligent people with comprehending and dealing with evolutionarily novel entities and situations that did not exist in the ancestral environment. Evolutionarily novel entities that more intelligent individuals are better able to comprehend and deal with may include ideas and lifestyles, which form the basis of their preferences and values." Seeing as how psychoactive substances, including alcohol, tobacco, and drugs, have only become available for regular human consumption in the last 10,000 years or less, they are considered as evolutionarily novel entities.

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Evolutionary psychologist Satoshi Kanazawa, who conducted the study along with Josephine E. E. U. Hellberg, found a correlation between the level of intelligence of an individual before the age of 16 and their frequency of alcohol consumption when they are in their 20s, 30s, and 40s. On the basis of their analysis of information provided by the National Child Development Study (NCDS) in the UK, they were able to conclude that very bright kids tested in the UK grew up to consume more alcohol in their 20s, 30s, and 40s. The same turned out to be the case for Americans.

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Additionally, the study was also able to determine that intelligent individuals really drink more, and it had nothing to do with their social status, nor did it have a correlation to whether they had "important" jobs. Their alcohol consumption tendencies were reliant on their level of intelligence alone. This idea is further backed by another study conducted by Finnish researchers who examined 3,000 fraternal and identical twins. According to reports, the research revealed that the twin who starts using language first would also be the first one to drink alcohol, as well as drinking more as a teenager when compared to the other.

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Verbal skills are generally considered a sign of social intelligence and this is also the reason why twins who are talkative have more friends and get into situations involving the consumption of alcohol. The mastering of speech earlier is also a sign that the child will have higher academic results later in life. By extension, it is also linked to higher alcohol consumption as shown by the aforementioned study. Explaining this idea, the authors of this study believe the reason could be that intelligence is associated with curiosity and the drive for new experiences.

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According to them, "Cognitive performance and reading abilities in childhood are related to higher stimulation-seeking tendencies." There have also been studies on whether there is a relation between an individual's IQ level and their choice of alcohol. As it turns out, smarter individuals have a stronger inclination towards wine as opposed to any other type of alcohol. A study analyzed the IQ of almost 2,000 Danish men and their drinking preferences in the period between the 1950s and the 1990s. It was able to come to the conclusion that there is, in fact, a link between how smart a person is and whether they choose wine when they grow older.

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Apparently, among those who prefer wine, almost 40 percent of the men were those with the highest IQ scores, while only 13 percent with the lowest, preferred the drink. These results also shed light on the relationship between a person's income, their educational qualifications, social status, and level of intelligence. Now you know why you should pick the cute guy sipping on wine at the bar as opposed to the rugged fellow chugging beer next to him (no matter how hot he is). On the other hand, you could also just ignore both of them and enjoy your own drink in peace. 

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